Living in Czech Republic
For practical information about Czech Republic, please visit https://www.czechtourism.com/practical-information/
For practical information about Czech Republic, please visit https://www.czechtourism.com/practical-information/


Living in Brno
For practical inforation about the city of Brno, please visit http://www.gotobrno.cz/en?langselect=1
For practical inforation about the city of Brno, please visit http://www.gotobrno.cz/en?langselect=1


Accommodation in Brno
There is plenty of accommodation possibilities. You can choose from private accommodation, university dormitories that are available for public or you can stay at some of the hotel or hostels in Brno. As for the private accommodation, you can use private...
There is plenty of accommodation possibilities. You can choose from private accommodation, university dormitories that are available for public or you can stay at some of the hotel or hostels in Brno.
As for the private accommodation, you can use private agencies. If you are interested, please contact them directly:
•www.flat-rent-brno.cz - the house, located close to the city centre, has 18 apartment units 1+1, fully furnished and equipped to meet your needs, ready to rent. For any additional information do not hesitate to contact Mr Robert Mitrič: robert.mitric@rmchallenge.cz
•www.foreigners.cz
•www.sreality.cz/en/search/apartments
•www.bezrealitky.cz (in Czech only)
•www.windpoint.cz
•www.forstudent.cz
•www.cityrealestate.cz/
•www.hosteljacob.cz
•www.byty.hyperinzerce.cz (in Czech only)
•www.chcispolubydlici.cz (in Czech only)
•www.studentreality.cz

For the university housing please visit: http://www.skm.muni.cz/ubytovani.php?akce=20&lang=en


Transportation in Brno
The public transport system consists of trams, city buses and trolley buses. Buses operate 24 hours a day. At night there are special night buses. Night buses leave every 30 - 60 minutes depending on the line. The main railway station (“Hlavní nádraží”) i...
The public transport system consists of trams, city buses and trolley buses. Buses operate 24 hours a day. At night there are special night buses. Night buses leave every 30 - 60 minutes depending on the line. The main railway station (“Hlavní nádraží”) is the central interchange point of all night trams and buses. The interval between most buses is 7 - 15 min from Monday to Friday during rush hours. Weekend intervals are 10 – 30 minutes. The average interval between most trams is approximately 8 minutes during rush hours on working days; otherwise every 10 – 15 minutes. Important meeting points and junctions in Brno Náměstí Svobody - the main square of the city center, between the Česká meeting point and the Hlavní nádraží meeting point Masarykova - together with Česká the most important street in the center, leading you from Náměstí Svobody to Hlavní nádraží. Česká - one of the main junctions, also a meeting point (we say „by the clock“– there is a clock at the corner) Hlavní nádraží (the Main Railway Station) - also one of the main meeting places and main junction For times, schedules and routes, see the search engine http://jizdnirady.idnes.cz/brno/spojeni/
Tickets
Tickets are sold at ticket vending machines, DPMB shops, kiosks and railway stations and via SMS at the stop. You can also buy a ticket for a higher price in the bus, just ask the driver and be sure you have the exact amount of money.
Brno city transport pass
For travelling in Brno you can either purchase a single ticket for each trip or use a monthly or quarterly pass (recommended). The validity of a single ticket is time and zone limited. The ticket is valid from the moment it has been validated for a period specified on it and only in those tariff zones marked on the ticket. With all tickets you can change vehicles within the time limit, except for the 10 minutes ticket - this is valid only in the vehicle in which it was validated. The ticket must be validated immediately after boarding a vehicle. During transfers, tickets cannot be further validated.
For more information about fares and connections in Brno see http://www.dpmb.cz/Default.aspx?seo=tickets


Finance
Currency The Czech currency is the koruna (crown, abbreviated Kč), which is made up of 100 haléřů (hellers, abbreviated hal.). Coins in the following denominations are in circulation: 1 crown, 2 crowns, 5 crowns, 10 crowns, 20 crowns and 50 crowns. In ad...
Currency
The Czech currency is the koruna (crown, abbreviated Kč), which is made up of 100 haléřů (hellers, abbreviated hal.). Coins in the following denominations are in circulation: 1 crown, 2 crowns, 5 crowns, 10 crowns, 20 crowns and 50 crowns. In addition there are the following notes: 50 crowns, 100 crowns, 200 crowns, 500 crowns, 1,000 crowns, 2,000 crowns and 5,000 crowns. Exchange rate For current exchange rate, see the website of the Czech National Bank (http://www.cnb.cz/en/financial_markets/foreign_exchange_market/exchange_rate_fixing/daily.jsp). Czech coins and banknotes here http://www.cnb.cz/miranda2/export/sites/www.cnb.cz/cs/o_cnb/publikace/download/brozura_DL_bankovky_mince.pdf
Cost of living
Brno offers a high quality of life for a quite nice price. The cost of living is very low in the Czech Republic compared to other EU countries, and you will be able to live very comfortably without spending large sums. The EXPATISTAN website shows you more in-depth overview on living costs in Brno which you may find useful. (https://www.expatistan.com/cost-of-living/brno)


Banks
If you are thinking of spending a longer time working in the Czech Republic, you will need to open a bank account. You can have a bank account of your own on condition that you are 18 years old – except for a few specific products. Foreigners must submit ...
If you are thinking of spending a longer time working in the Czech Republic, you will need to open a bank account. You can have a bank account of your own on condition that you are 18 years old – except for a few specific products. Foreigners must submit a permit to stay in the CR. You will be asked for two proofs of identity when opening an account. The banks specify which kind of documents they need. It is usually an identity card and e.g. a birth certificate, insurance card, passport, driving licence or employment ID for citizens of the CR. As for foreigners, the banks differentiate between foreigners coming from EU-member countries and the rest of the world. EU foreigners usually present an identification document issued and valid in the EU (ID card of an EU member state), possibly their passport. The second document is, similarly to CR citizens, e.g. a birth certificate, driving licence or residence permit issued by the Ministry of Interior CR. For foreigners from non-EU countries, the key document is their passport and the other documents are the same as for EU citizens. Banks always prefer documents with photographs.
Basic account
You may deposit money into your account, withdraw cash from an ATM dispenser and pay regular bills. It is not possible to withdraw more money than you have saved with this type of account.
Current account
The most widespread type of account in the Czech Republic. Just like with the basic type of bank account, it is possible to deposit and withdraw cash, use the ATM dispenser, make money transactions, etc. Moreover, this type of account enables its owner to use a debit card for payment in shops. In case you will be interested in a future loan, you have a chance to obtain it as a side product of the current account.
Savings account
This type of account is not normally used for routine money transactions. It serves for saving money, and the banks offer higher interest rates for this type of account. No payment card or cheque books are included in this account. You may withdraw cash but the withdrawals are limited and you have to contact the bank in advance. Be sure to get information about the specific conditions of particular banks. Every bank has its own specific terms.
Source: www.czech.cz


Exchanging money
Never exchange your money in the street, do not buy currency from strangers, for instance in restaurants, airports or discos!!! You can get Czech crowns in banks or in private exchange offices. In a bank exchange, you will pay a minimum of 2% of the total...
Never exchange your money in the street, do not buy currency from strangers, for instance in restaurants, airports or discos!!! You can get Czech crowns in banks or in private exchange offices. In a bank exchange, you will pay a minimum of 2% of the total amount for the exchange. There are often exchange machines installed by the banks – you put in your currency and the machine gives you the equivalent in Czech crowns. Here, the exchange fee will be deducted, as well. If you decide to exchange your money in a private exchange, always first ask the clerk to tell you the precise amount he is going to pay you! The 0 % commission sign often does not relate to sale, but purchase of the foreign currency. A super-advantageous exchange rate that the exchange office advertises distinctly often happens to apply only to exchange above a certain limit (such as EUR 100) or fees for exchange are added. The exchange office is responsible for stating everything truly in several languages, however, the conditions are often written in very small print that is easy to overlook. You can also exchange your money at the reception desk in the hotel where you are staying. The easiest way is to get the money from ATMs, which are installed practically at every corner in bigger cities. The absolute majority of them accepts all common international types of payment card (Visa, MasterCard, Plus, Maestro, Cirrus, and others). You can also pay in most shops and restaurants or petrol stations with these cards. Source: www.czech.cz


Leisure time
Brno Tourist Information Centre The city of Brno operates a cultural and information centre at Radnická 8, in the building of the Old Town Hall. It has a wide selection of maps, brochures and other information on Brno and the surrounding region. See http:...
Brno Tourist Information Centre
The city of Brno operates a cultural and information centre at Radnická 8, in the building of the Old Town Hall. It has a wide selection of maps, brochures and other information on Brno and the surrounding region. See http://ticbrno.cz/en
Brno Expat centre – SC International BEC provides skilled foreign professionals and their families who live and work in Brno or plan to do so. They also organize expert seminars and informal meetings where expats can exchange experience and make new contacts. Last but not least, they regularly publish useful articles, interviews with local expats and a monthly newsletter. To have a better insight to arts and culture go to: http://www.brnoexpatcentre.eu/services/arts-and-culture/


Shopping
Brno has a great variety of shopping opportunities – from little boutiques to speciality shops to large shopping malls containing everything you will ever need. Several large malls are situated right in the centre of town. •The Velký Špalíček complex at ...
Brno has a great variety of shopping opportunities – from little boutiques to speciality shops to large shopping malls containing everything you will ever need. Several large malls are situated right in the centre of town.
•The Velký Špalíček complex at Mečová 2 holds stores, restaurants and a multiplex cinema, while nearby the shopping mall at Orlí 3 is also a good destination for everyday needs such as food and clothing.
•The shopping and cultural centre Galerie Vaňkovka (www.galerie-vankovka.cz) is located between the railway and bus station on the edge of the town centre. It comprises 130 stores, restaurants and cafés and is open seven days a week.
• The Avion Shopping Park at Skandinávská 2 is found to the south of Brno, heading in the direction of Bratislava.
•Shopaholics might also like to check out the Olympia shopping and entertainment centre Modřice to the south of Brno, and also the Futurum Shopping Centre at Vídeňská 100, plus the Královo pole Shopping Centre at Cimburkova 4.
•Closer to home, visitors can find some excellent souvenir shops on Slovákova, selling handmade crafts in wood, leather and ceramics.
•The Cabbage Market (Zelný trh) is the perfect destination if you desperately need fresh fruit and vegetables plus it's a great photo opportunity and good place to chat up the locals.
•Česká has some good bookshops and you can pick up excellent local wines, beers and spirits to take home at the Tesco supermarket found behind the main railway station. (Source: ArrivalGuides.com)
Addresses and maps of some shopping centres at http://www.czech4you.com/index.php?menuitem=226


Electrical appliances
The electric power in the Czech Republic is 220 volts, 50 Hz AC, so you may need an adapter and a converter to use your electrical appliances. If you have dual-voltage appliances, you will only need an adapter. It is best to purchase what you might need i...
The electric power in the Czech Republic is 220 volts, 50 Hz AC, so you may need an adapter and a converter to use your electrical appliances. If you have dual-voltage appliances, you will only need an adapter. It is best to purchase what you might need in your home country. Worldwide Voltage Conventor: http://www.voltageconverters.com/voltageguide.htm


Waste Collection fee in the City of Brno
From 1st January 2013, the local fees for Brno municipal waste collection shall be paid by all foreign nationals (EU and non-EU) staying in Brno for more than 3 months (detailed description is also available at http://www.brno.cz/en/sprava-mesta/magistrat...
From 1st January 2013, the local fees for Brno municipal waste collection shall be paid by all foreign nationals (EU and non-EU) staying in Brno for more than 3 months (detailed description is also available at http://www.brno.cz/en/sprava-mesta/magistrat-mesta-brna/usek-rozvoje-mesta/odbor-zivotniho-prostredi/oddeleni-spravy-poplatku-za-komunalni-odpad/mistni-poplatek-za-provoz-systemu-nakladani-s-komunalnim-odpadem/#c4467888).
The foresaid are obliged to 1) pay the fee for the respective number of months and a 2) report this fact to the fee administrator.


Medical aid
With your health insurance you are entitled to visit any general practitioner or dentist. If you have eye problems or any other problem you should first visit a general practitioner, who will examine you and then, if necessary, arrange for you to see a sp...
With your health insurance you are entitled to visit any general practitioner or dentist. If you have eye problems or any other problem you should first visit a general practitioner, who will examine you and then, if necessary, arrange for you to see a specialist. Unless it is urgent, we recommend making an appointment in advance on the phone. Don't forget to take the insurance card, number or any document proving your insurance.
Emergency
If you are faced with an urgent need for medical attention at a time when doctors’ offices are not open, you should go to the one of the followings emergency service (there is a CZK 90 fee for seeing the emergency room):

Emergency Hospital (injuries and emergency dental care)
Úrazová nemocnice v Brně
Ponávka 6
Tel: +420 545 538 111
Fax: +420 545 211 082
www.unbr.cz
Surgery hours: Mon – Fri: 17:00 – 7:00
Weekends: nonstop
Most of the medicines available elsewhere can be obtained here, though not necessarily in every pharmacy. In case you need some kind of medicine in the evening, at night or over the weekend, when shops are normally closed, there is a non-stop pharmacy located conveniently in the centre of the city, just off náměstí Svobody, at Koliště 47.

Emergency Pharmacy
Koliště 47
Tel: +420 545 424 811
Opening hours: Mon– Sun: nonstop

Kobližná 28/7
Tel: +420 542 212 110
Opening hours: Mon– Sun: nonstop


Health insurance
It is obligatory for all citizens and people present in the Czech Republic to have your insurance cards and ID cards or passports always with you. Please carry it at all times, as you might be checked by members of the Police or the Police Office for Fore...
It is obligatory for all citizens and people present in the Czech Republic to have your insurance cards and ID cards or passports always with you. Please carry it at all times, as you might be checked by members of the Police or the Police Office for Foreigners.


Safety & emergency
European emergency phone number 112 – police, fire, medical and rescue service Czech emergency phone numbers: •158 – Police •156 – Municipal Police •155 – Emergency Medical Service •150 – Fire and Rescue Service
European emergency phone number 112 – police, fire, medical and rescue service
Czech emergency phone numbers:
•158 – Police
•156 – Municipal Police
•155 – Emergency Medical Service
•150 – Fire and Rescue Service


Mobile operators & communication
There are four mobile operators providing mobile telephone services in the Czech Republic: Telefónica O2, T-Mobile, Vodafone and U:fon. Call charges are calculated according to the number of call minutes and differ for each operator. Calls between telepho...
There are four mobile operators providing mobile telephone services in the Czech Republic: Telefónica O2, T-Mobile, Vodafone and U:fon. Call charges are calculated according to the number of call minutes and differ for each operator. Calls between telephone numbers maintained by one operator are more advantageous than calling other mobile networks. Operators also offer advantageous service packages at fixed monthly rates and also so-called pre-paid cards for customers who don’t wish to commit themselves.
Telephone codes:
•Telefónica O2 Czech Republic (original codes: 601, 602, 606, 607, 72)
•T-Mobile (original codes: 603, 604, 605, 73)
•Vodafone (original codes: 608, 77)
•U:fon (code: 79)
Source: www.czech.cz


Postal and delivery services
The provider of postal services in the Czech Republic is the state-owned Czech Post. It provides domestic and international postal, financial and courier services. It also accepts, transports and delivers direct and indirect postal consignments for busine...
The provider of postal services in the Czech Republic is the state-owned Czech Post. It provides domestic and international postal, financial and courier services. It also accepts, transports and delivers direct and indirect postal consignments for business subjects. Czech Post is also the owner of a so-called postal reservation (monopoly), which applies to domestic letter mail. This concerns a reserved consignment if the letter mail weighs less than 50 g. Therefore the postal monopoly does not apply to letter mail weighing over 50 g. Postal consignments to foreign countries or from foreign countries are not monopolised and the postal reservation does not apply to them. Czech Post currently uses three types of transport for postal consignments: road, rail and air. As of 2007 Czech Post also issues excerpts from the Real Estate Register, the Trades Register and the Commercial Register. It also provides Registered Electronic Mail services, which is the electronic analogy of a registered postal consignment, and also sells motorway coupons. You can find more information about postal services and rates here. Apart from Czech Post there is also a network of delivery and courier companies in the Czech Republic, which endeavour to assure the most rapid delivery of consignments for their customers. Use of courier services is particularly appropriate when the consignment must be delivered immediately. Courier services in the Czech Republic assure transport of both letter and item consignments for households, companies, entrepreneurs and large corporations in this country and throughout Europe.
Detailed information are provided on the website of the Czech Post (Česká pošta): http://www.ceskaposta.cz/en/
Source: www.czech.cz


Climate
The Czech Republic is a landlocked country located in moderate geographical latitudes in the Northern Hemisphere. The climate of the Czech Republic is mild but variable locally and throughout the year. The climate differs markedly among the various region...
The Czech Republic is a landlocked country located in moderate geographical latitudes in the Northern Hemisphere. The climate of the Czech Republic is mild but variable locally and throughout the year. The climate differs markedly among the various regions of the Czech Republic, depending on the height above sea level. Generally speaking, the higher you are, average temperatures may drop more and rainfall is more likely. Many other factors also play a role in this – the border mountain ranges, for example, significantly influence ground-level air flow and rainfall. Various height levels of the sun during the year cause the changing of the seasons, differentiated from each other mainly by the development of temperatures and precipitation. Similarly to the whole moderate northern band, the beginning of the year in the Czech Republic is also characterized by a cold winter. After this comes spring, followed by a warm summer and chilly autumn. The alternation of the seasons has a marked effect, above all on vegetation. The weather at any given time may differ significantly from the long-term average. This variability of the weather is caused mainly by the changeable location and magnitude of two main pressure centres: the Icelandic Low and the Azores High. Mainly during the warm middle of the year, it can generally be said that expansion of the high pressure projection into our territory causes warmer and drier temperatures, whereas the Icelandic Low manifests itself with a greater number of atmospheric fronts, which bring more clouds and precipitation. The climate of the Czech Republic can then be labelled as moderate, of course with great local diversity seen throughout the year. Further changeability then is up to the weather itself.
Source: www.czech.cz


Public holidays
Public holidays in the Czech Republic: •1 January - New Year's Day •5 April - Easter Sunday •6 April - Easter Monday •1 May - May Day •8 May - Liberation Day •5 July - St Cyril and St Methodius •6 July - Jan Hus Day •28 September - Statehood Day •...
Public holidays in the Czech Republic:
•1 January - New Year's Day
•5 April - Easter Sunday
•6 April - Easter Monday
•1 May - May Day
•8 May - Liberation Day
•5 July - St Cyril and St Methodius
•6 July - Jan Hus Day
•28 September - Statehood Day
•28 October - Independence Day
•17 November - Freedom and Democracy Day
•24 December - Christmas Eve
•25 December - Christmas Day
•26 December - 2nd Day of Christmas
For detailed information about Czech holidays and traditions go to http://www.myczechrepublic.com/czech_culture/czech_holidays/


Customs & traditions
Czech folk customs emanate from Christian or pagan traditions and often differ from region to region. In cities, they are no longer observed as much as they once were, but in villages, primarily in the Moravian and Silesian regions, they are still very mu...
Czech folk customs emanate from Christian or pagan traditions and often differ from region to region. In cities, they are no longer observed as much as they once were, but in villages, primarily in the Moravian and Silesian regions, they are still very much alive. Customs and traditions continue to attract great interest of all of the inhabitants of the Czech Republic. They are an interesting addition to foreign tourists’ stay, especially if visiting the Czech Republic at Christmas or Easter.

The Czech Year Carnival (Masopust)
A three-day festival marking the start of the forty days of lent, which end with Easter. Masopust preparations were preceded by the so-called “Fat Thursday” – fat because one was to fill up with drink and food as much as possible before fasting. The culmination of this festival is Mardi Gras, when processions of people wearing masks and theatre performances are held.
The Passion Week
The last week of the forty days of lent is called the Passion Week, in memory of Christ’s suffering. During this week, young people walk around with rattles whose sound replaces the ringing of bells, which according to faith have flown to Rome and are thus silent.
Ash Wednesday
The Wednesday prior to Easter Sunday: the day used to be called ugly, black, or ash-sweeping, because chimneys used to be swept on that day. He who would frown and be nasty on that day would frown on all of the Wednesdays of the year.
Green Thursday
It is customary to eat spinach on Green Thursday. The church bells sound for the last time, and then they “fly off to Rome”, to be silent until White Saturday. In many places, people believe that when the bells ring for the last time on Green Thursday, they should jingle their money to make sure that it sticks to them. “Judases” are baked – specially shaped ceremonial buns made of leavened dough.
Good Friday
No meat should be eaten on this day. Beliefs in the magical power of the Earth, and in the miracles that happen on that day, are associated with Good Friday. According to folk traditions, the Earth opened on Good Friday to reveal the treasures hidden therein for a brief moment. That is why soil could not be moved on that day, and no work in the field was carried out. In the evening, treasure hunters could be seen in the forests, around ruined castles and in other deserted places. Usually, on Good Friday, theatre performances – passion plays – are put on. In Christianity, this is considered to be the day of Christ’s crucifixion.
White Saturday
White Saturday is the last day of the forty days of lent. In front of the church, fire was consecrated – this tradition was called “the burning of Judas”. The custom of carrying candles to church has survived to this day: they are consecrated by being lit from the holy Easter paschal candle.
Easter Sunday
Traditionally a sponge-cake Easter lamb is baked. This lamb, together with a sweet leavened loaf (mazanec), egg, bread or wine, used to be taken to church for the priest to bless. In the Christian tradition, Easter Sunday is the greatest celebration of the ecclesiastical year, celebrating Christ’s resurrection and victory over death. Easter is a movable holiday, celebrated on the first Sunday after the first full moon, after 21 March.
Easter Monday
Easter Monday is a day for relaxation and joy, and a celebration of new life. It is a holiday that is related both to the Christian tradition of resurrection and to the pagan tradition related to winter turning into spring. Boys flick girls with willow branches braided together and decorated with ribbons – they are supposed to transfer the vital sap of trees to the human body to ensure that they are healthy and merry throughout the next year. In return, the boys receive painted eggs from the girls. In certain regions, girls used to pour water on boys, to ensure that they were fresh, or on Tuesday, girls went around with whips in place of the boys.

April Fools’ Day – 1 April
This day is connected with various jokes and hoaxes, with people trying to trick their relatives and friends into believing them. This is not a typical Czech tradition, but given the inhabitants’ great sense of humour, this tradition caught on well in the Czech Republic. The Burning of Witches on Walpurgis Night It has been believed since the Middle Ages that, on certain days, evil forces are stronger than at other times. That was true of the Walpurgis Night of the 30th of April, when fires were burnt in elevated places to defend against witches. Over time, the “witch-burning” tradition took hold and has endured.

1 May – A Time for Love
On the first of May, girls must be kissed under a blossoming cherry tree in order for them not to wither, but remain beautiful. On this day, lovers in Prague head for Petřín Hill to lay a flower at the monument of Karel Hynek Mácha (1810–1836), a Czech Romantic poet and the author of the poem “Máj” (May). The poem tells a story of the tragic love of two young people, and is one of the classic works of Czech literature. The first of May is also celebrated as the international day of labour.

All Saints’ Day – 1-2 November (Dušičky)
Since 998, the holiday of the deceased has been celebrated on 1 and 2 November. In certain villages, special pastries called “little souls” – dušičky were baked for beggars and travellers. Today, flowers, wreaths, and burning candles are put on graves, to commemorate the dead.

St. Martin’s Day – 11 November
“St. Martin arrives on a white horse” – this saying identifies the festival of St. Martin as the day for the first snowfall. Traditionally, a St. Martin goose and St. Martin pastries used to be eaten. Recent years have seen the increasing popularity of the renewed tradition of opening young “St. Martin” wine, the Czech version of the French Beaujolais Nouveau.

Advent
Advent (the four weeks before the Christmas holidays) is a time of fasting and is connected with preparations for Christmas. The name of the season comes from the Latin word adventus and means “arrival” – i.e. the birth of Jesus Christ.

St. Barbara’s Day – 4 December
The holiday of St. Barbara is connected with the cutting of St. Barbara’s branches, referred to as barborky. According to the folk tradition, a branch had to be cut with the first ray of sun, from a cherry tree at least ten years old, and was then to be taken to a house where an unmarried girl lived. If the branch blossomed on Christmas Eve, it meant that the girl would find a groom in the coming year. Today barborky are still a typical pre-Christmas household decoration. In Bohemia, children put stockings in their windows on St. Barbara’s eve, into which St. Barbara puts small sweets, or coal, rocks, or potatoes if the child was naughty in the preceding period.



St. Nicholas’ Day – 6 December
On the eve of this holiday, St. Nicholas and an angel descend from the heavens to Earth, accompanied by a devil. Together, they visit children – praising the good ones and reproaching the naughty ones, telling them to behave better. Children must sing a song or recite a poem (in the past, they prayed and sang carols) to the St. Nicholas group, and in return the angel gives them sweets or toys; the naughty children receive coal or potatoes from the devil. If the procession of St. Nicholas, the angel, and the devil misses one’s house, one may put a stocking in the window, under one’s pillow, or on the door handle for night-time gifts from St. Nicholas.

Christmas – 24 December
In the Czech Republic, the main Christmas holiday is Christmas Eve. On this day, you will encounter fairytales in Czech households, as well as mistletoe, and, naturally, a decorated Christmas tree. There are many traditions connected to Christmas Eve – an all-day fast (one who lasts until the evening will see a golden pig), the casting of lead (to tell the future from the shape of the cast piece), or the throwing of a slipper (if it lands with the toes pointing at the door, it means that the girl in the house will marry within a year). Meatless dishes are served for lunch – peas, barley, or a mushroom casserole. Once the first star comes out, families sit for their Christmas Eve dinner. The festive meal includes fish soup and fried carp with potato salad. Traditional Christmas cookies are served as dessert. After dinner, the family gathers at the Christmas tree, under which the Baby Jesus puts presents.

25 December is the first Christmas holiday – Christmas Day. Families meet for lunch – most often, a roast duck or goose are served, with dumplings and cabbage. On 26 December, St. Stephen’s Day, the second Christmas holiday is celebrated. On this day, carollers used to go from house to house carolling – singing and wishing health and success in farming. For their carols, they received fruit, money, or an invitation to come to the house for refreshments.

New Year’s – 1 January
The most broadly known motto for this day is: “Throughout the whole year, as on New Year’s Day”. Traditionally, lentils or peas are served on New Year’s Day, to ensure the multiplication of money. No poultry is made, so that “luck would not fly away”. 1 January is also a national holiday – The Day of the Renewal of an Independent Czech State.

Three Kings – 6 January
The end of the Christmas season takes place on 6 January, with the commemoration of the arrival in Bethlehem of the three wise men from the east – the Three Kings, called Caspar, Melichar, and Balthazar in Czech. The Three Kings go from house to house and write (using consecrated chalk) the letters K+M+B on doors – it is, however, to denote the Latin words “Christus mansionem benedicat” – May Christ bless this house."

Source: www.eu2009.cz


Czech cuisine
Czech cuisine is not exactly a synonym for healthy cooking, but everybody will probably find some meals they'll love. It may be the potato soup, the traditional roast pork with dumplings and sauerkraut, the fruit filled dumplings, or the apple strudel. Cz...
Czech cuisine is not exactly a synonym for healthy cooking, but everybody will probably find some meals they'll love. It may be the potato soup, the traditional roast pork with dumplings and sauerkraut, the fruit filled dumplings, or the apple strudel. Czech cooking and eating habits have been shifting towards a healthier lifestyle, but traditional Czech recipes are still very popular - and those tend to be high in calories, fat and sugar. Sauces and condiments are popular. Here you can find some Czech food staples: http://www.myczechrepublic.com/czech_culture/czech_cuisine.html
Source: www.myczechrepublic.com


Visa requirements
More information about general visa information can be found on the website of Ministry of Foreing Affairs of the Czech Republic: http://www.mzv.cz/jnp/en/information_for_aliens/general_visa_information/index.html or http://www.mzv.cz/jnp/en/information_...
More information about general visa information can be found on the website of Ministry of Foreing Affairs of the Czech Republic: http://www.mzv.cz/jnp/en/information_for_aliens/general_visa_information/index.html or http://www.mzv.cz/jnp/en/information_for_aliens/frequently_asked_questions/index.html


Do you have a question directly to any internship?
Please contact directly the contact person written in the internship chosen.
Please contact directly the contact person written in the internship chosen.


Your answer not found?
Please contact us here internship@muni.cz
Please contact us here internship@muni.cz